WEST CHESTER (December 18) – State Senator Andy Dinniman was awarded West Chester University’s President’s Medal for Service for his leadership and service to the university, its students, and educators.

The award is presented to “a distinguished educator and public servant [who] exemplifies a commitment to the mission and values of this University and a spirit of service that has greatly enriched the lives of students, educators and the citizens of the Commonwealth.”

Senator Dinniman receives the President’s Medal for Service from West Chester University President Greg R. Weisenstein during recent commencement ceremonies.

Senator Dinniman receives the President’s Medal for Service from West Chester University President Greg R. Weisenstein during recent commencement ceremonies.

Dinniman, who has served on the faculty of West Chester University for many years, said he was honored and humbled by the recognition, which was formally presented by West Chester University President Greg R. Weisenstein during recent commencement ceremonies.

“It’s been a privilege to serve West Chester University, to be a part of the academic and larger community and to contribute in a meaningful way to the scholarly discourse that continues to make public institutions of higher education, like West Chester, so great,” Dinniman said. “I continue to take those same values to the state legislature to enhance, improve, and expand access to higher education for all.”

Dinniman, who holds a doctorate in Education from Penn State, served on the faculty at West Chester University in a variety of capacities over the years, including directing the university’s Center for International Program and teaching a popular course in Global Perspectives as part of the university’s Interdisciplinary Course Curriculum.DinnimanWCU2

In the Senate, he serves as minority chair of the Senate Education Committee and has worked for investments in all levels of education. In addition, Dinniman has led efforts to make higher education more affordable and accessible to all, such as measures to rein in the rising costs of textbooks and materials.

“Like public service, part of the joy of teaching is having the opportunity to work with a diverse group of individuals from all walks of life,” he said. “I enjoy having the chance to interact with the students and young people who represent the future of our Commonwealth and our nation.”

Dinniman also serves on the Education Commission of the States, the Pennsylvania State Board of Education, the Pennsylvania State Public School Building Authority and the Pennsylvania Higher Educational Facilities Authority, as well as the member of the board of the Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority.